Monthly Archives: June 2015

Currently Reading . . . MAYA: A NOVEL by C. W. Huntington, Jr.

MayaI’m so excited to be reading Maya: A Novel by C. W. Huntington, Jr. It was published in hard copy a few weeks ago and today – 23 June 2015 – it comes out on Kindle as an e-book. I have been reading a galley copy thus far, but as I am in the middle of a move across continents, e-books have recently become an important personal library component.

The e-book is far from the main reason I am excited about reading Maya. The novel begins with an epigraph that summarizes the definition of the Sanskrit word māyā from the Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary. It reads: “Māyā, (f.) art, wisdom, extraordinary or supernatural power, illusion, unreality, deception, fraud, trick, sorcery, witchcraft, magic.” You see, C. W. Huntington knows his stuff. He is a Sanskrit scholar with a Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies. He is currently Professor and Chair of Religious Studies at Hartwick College. His main academic focus is on early Mahayana Buddhism, specifically Candrakīrti and early Indian Mādhyamika.

You might think that, given his academic background, Huntington’s fiction writing style could be stilted and pedantic. Amazon has even categorized the novel under “Fiction: Religion and Spirituality.” But Huntington’s fiction writing style is so accessible that the reader is powerfully pulled into the adventures of the main character, Stanley Harrington. Through Harrington’s perspective, this academic-turned-fiction author recreates an expat Indian experience for his readers in surreal, colourful, earthy detail. Here is the blurb from the publisher, Wisdom Publications:

“It is 1975 and India is in turmoil. American Stanley Harrington arrives to study Sanskrit philosophy and escape his failing marriage. When he finds himself witness to a violent accident, he begins to question his grip on reality.

Maya introduces us to an entertaining cast of hippies, expats, and Indians of all walks of life. From a hermit hiding in the Himalayan jungle since the days of the British Raj, to an accountant at the Bank of India with a passion for Sanskrit poetry, to the last in a line of brahman scholars, Stanley’s path ultimately leads him to a Tibetan yogi, who enlists the American’s help in translating a mysterious ancient text.

Maya, literally “illusion,” is an extended meditation on the unraveling of identity. Filled with rich observations and arresting reflections, it mines the porous border between memory and imagination.”

I hope to post a write up of my reading experience of Maya, along with some email discussions with Dr. Huntington about the novel, all before the end of September. In the mean time, please read the novel along with me and if you have any questions about Maya you would like me to pass along to Dr. Huntington, feel free to post them in the comments or contact me through this blog.

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